Five films that (almost) everyone can enjoy this Halloween

I would guess that I have my mother’s enthusiasm for all things spooky to thank for my love of my dad’s birthday (happy birthday my favourite old[er] dude!), or, more accurately, the celebration he shares his birthday with: Halloween. Whilst the meaning of this day has changed with cultural beliefs and religious practices, I am glad we have retained the “dressing up as scary stuff” aspect of Samhain, even if (most of us) are no longer trying to scare off ghosts and other malevolent spirits. Growing up I used to look forward to my mum’s halloween parties more than any other annual celebration, and still love decorating the house and opening the door to young trick or treaters out in pursuit of whatever goodies they can get their hands on. But there is another reason I love this date, and it is that All Hallow’s Eve inspires so many who normally stay well clear of anything of the sort to dip their feet into the world of scary movies (which I am usually otherwise forced to watch alone).

Of course, there are a billion lists already available online covering “the scariest films of all time”, “best horror/insert-horror-subgenre-here films of all time”, “best new horror movies”, etc., so you’ll be happy to learn that this is going to be something at least a little different. Below you will find a list of films (of no specific genre) to watch on Halloween, but offer something more than just being scary. I back this approach for a few reasons:

  1. Not everyone is scared by the same things, and so if a film’s only strength is its “scariness” and little else, the impact of the film will vary by the degree to which you possess a certain phobia. What’s more, much like can happen when someone describes a food as “spicy”, you may accidentally invite a pissing-contest in which people begin to joke around and make light of a film (in an attempt to show how unfazed they are or something), which whilst sometimes a good laugh (particularly with “so-bad-they’re-good” gems, although that’s kind of the point I suppose) can ruin the experience for everyone else. After all, most fictional works are more enjoyable when one can suspend disbelief and lose themselves in the story.
  2. I believe at least most of the core facets of what makes a film “good” to be universally applicable rather than genre specific: having an interesting or engaging plot or concept, the strength of the acting, possessing a strong art style/cinematography, and many more.
  3. There’s something for everyone, or at least a better response to the person at your halloween gathering who won’t join in watching something because they “just don’t see the point of scaring yourself” (and frankly more reason to watch a film altogether).
  4. I save myself some grief at the hands of the Genre-Police (ever notice those comments something along the lines of “Actually, x or y movie isn’t horror, but psychological thriller”?). More to the point, many films outside the conventional genres of horror/thriller (and their infinite sub-genres) can also match the definition of “horror” (a thing causing an intense feeling of fear, shock, dismay, disgust, anxiety, or nervousness).

 

So, without further ado, my list of Halloween recommendations:

Silence of the Lambs (1991)

Nominated for 7 and winning no less than all “big five” Academy Awards (including Best  Actor for Hopkins’s 16 minutes of screen time), this one really needs no introduction. Hannibal Lecter has become one of cinema’s most iconic – and chilling – characters for very good reason. (A good one to reach for in the company of film snobs).

 

I Saw the Devil (2010)

This Korean masterpiece is as beautifully filmed as it is unflinchingly savage. A cruel, tense, and violent, yet incredibly human and emotional (if you can see beyond the blood), game of cat and mouse.

 

Goodnight Mommy (2015)

This Austrian film plays with some real (and terrifying) psychological conditions (such as Capgras syndrome), and is a triumph in artistic style, concept, and storyline, which through a series of twists and turns will make you question what you accept to be real.

 

The Invitation (2016)

Slow and steady wins the race. Another beautifully shot movie that plays wonderfully with human psychology, this time in the context of a dinner party between old friends. This film controls both pace and tension levels throughout to create a complex emotional rollercoaster, tackling many difficult themes from relationships to death along the way.

 

Hush (2016)

This film takes a familiar horror movie setting – an isolated house in the woods – and ramps up the tension by excluding an entire sense: the protagonist is deaf. I love that this movie has a leading character whose disability is not the crux of the film but is rather an aspect of her character used to change one’s perspective of an otherwise clichéd concept, which I see as both ingenious (from a storyline perspective) and empowering . What’s more the film stays engaging despite the scarcity of dialogue and being filmed at a single location, which speaks volumes of not only the storyline itself, but also the movie’s direction and cinematography.

 

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What’s in my camera bag? Part 4: Diana F+

And so, we come to my favourite camera, the jewel in my photography crown (my cheap blue rucksack). It’s one of a limited run of 1000 “Explorer Nocturne” Diana F+ cameras made by Lomographische AG, based on the Great Wall Plastic Factory‘s original Diana box camera, a cheap camera (mostly sold as a novelty item or even given out as prizes at carnivals and funfairs) whose production run (and that of its imitators) appears to have ceased in the 1970s. While I believe 35mm variants of both the original and modern versions of the camera exist, mine shoots medium-format 120 film.

Despite the modern “Diana+” having been upgraded from box to system camera (technically), it still “suffers” from the characteristic blurriness/softness of focus, colour fringing, abnormalities in colour rendition, vignetting, and light leaks associated with the original. Of course, these inclusions are the product of technical flaws in the physical process of capturing the image, and as such if taking flawless photos is your thing, this is not the camera for you. But this (to the converted, at least) is their very appeal. In the age of photoshop and DSLR cameras with interchangeable lenses; large, high-end sensors; and megapixel counts approaching 50 (such as the Nikon D850), one would struggle greatly to justify the use of analogue cameras at all if it weren’t for these most perfect imperfections, a “fingerprint” of not only the model used, but even of a particular camera itself.

As I have previously discussed, I am particularly fond of artistic and abstract photography in general (much more so than I am of the various forms of “documentary” photography in which technicality can so easily take precedence over aesthetic), and 19th and 20th century pictorialism and the “are-bure-bokeh” style of the Japanese Provoke photographers in particular. This camera’s “flaws”, when embraced and even exploited and intentionally exaggerated can have a significant artistic effect. What’s more, the manual winding of film allows for multiple exposures in a single frame, which can make for some particularly interesting effects (see example below). The addition of its beautiful looking flash, which has a slit for gel filters, further enhances the photos dream-like qualities by allowing “colour-splashing” images.

Beyond the benefits of digital photography I have previously discussed, I would argue that the greatest downfall of analogue photography is faced if one has to rely on external companies for the development, scanning, and printing of your rolls. I am currently researching the best development tanks and chemicals for developing my own photos at home, as well as researching scanners and scanning frames for 120 film, due to having had no end of trouble with my local photo shops. Firstly, it is exceptionally expensive: £17/$22 per roll. Secondly, 120 is often no longer developed in-house (it’s a fairly rare film format nowadays), and so I have to wait at least a week for my negatives to be ready for scanning. Then the scan itself presents the largest problem: I have had to return three times already for my most recent prints, which firstly were scanned at too low a resolution and printed very poorly, the next time they were correctly scanned but photos were missing, and those that hadn’t been lost were incorrectly cut (and somebody has put something sticky on my precious negatives!), and as such I am still awaiting my most recent photos as this “goes to press”. The truth is, the modern day photo shop is dying. The staff are often unfamiliar with handling film as it is seldom used, and as such the product is frankly sub-standard. If you are lucky enough to have a local shop that is still run by genuine enthusiasts who live for photography and take great pride in their product, please do everything you can to support them, and let me know where I can find them!

But, as they say, one sometimes has to suffer for their art…


Reunión (2017).


Hogar (2017).

 

Find more of my work here.

 

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Everything You Thought blog! (What’s the deal?)

Just under a year ago I decided to take the plunge and jump head first into blogging. I set up a blog because I’ve always enjoyed writing and reading blogs, and for a couple of months I posted daily (if you want a trip down memory lane, check it out). I started out writing about whatever had gone on that day, how I was feeling, or what was on my mind, and I loved it. At first.

I fell into a new job, which despite seeming promising as I sat with contract before me (not my dream job, but putting that BSc to good use and paying as well as someone freshly graduated could possibly ask for), presented long and thankless working days, expectated to work far beyond the contracted hours for no overtime pay, beside tired and grumpy colleagues living in constant terror of being fired. I was back living between my parents’ homes in the town all my closest friends have left (it’s too expensive to live in on a starting salary, so unless you’re happy living at home you’ve got to fly the nest). I became exhausted and demoralised. It became increasingly difficult to find something new to write about every day as I had when I started (my intention was to write a “daily vlog” – yes, I love watching those on youtube – style blog). This only served to make me aware that I was working more and more, and living less and less. Things got in the way and I’d miss a post, then have to write two the next day. It became stressful. It sucked.

I now find myself, around a year later, in a similar position, but this time I’m doing it right: I’ve recently been through some selection interviews and am hoping to start a new job, but I’ve taken my time applying to hundreds of dream jobs, ones could imagine enjoying and would like to try (no more taking any old thing), and only in locations I’d like to live; and I really want to blog again, but am setting realistic goals this time and have a focus in mind this time (I’m not doing anyone else’s shtik, but my own thing). I still love listening to and making music, taking photos, watching movies, reading, exploring, skateboarding, but a lot has changed, too. I’ve taken time to travel, spending the last four months abroad taking photos and giving myself a real holiday; I’ve taken the time to visit and catch up with my extended family and some old friends living abroad, many of whom I hadn’t seen for years; and I’ve finally knuckled down and polished off my debut EP, going ahead and releasing it independently earlier this summer (more about that later).

My plan for the blog is to focus on the things I love the most: music, photography, film, skateboarding, and science. This isn’t to say I won’t talk about anything else, but most things in my life relate to one of these five topics in one way or another. My plan is to post on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, plus an audio podcast on Saturdays. This should permit me the time to produce quality posts even once I’m working full-time again, and to avoid falling into the trap of trying to think of something completely new to write about each day.

So, I’m back, and here to stay!
See you on Wednesday,

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